Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Global Veterinary Summit Florida, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

John F Bradfield

AAALAC International
USA

Keynote: Research animal welfare and scientific integrity: An AAALAC International perspective

Time : 10:05-10:35

OMICS International Veterinary Summit-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker John F Bradfield photo
Biography:

John F Bradfield is Senior Director, Association for the Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care (AAALAC-International). He is a veterinarian and a Diplomate of the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine. John Bradfield also has PhD in experimental pathology with scholarly publications in various areas of laboratory animal medicine, wound healing, vascular and platelet biology. Dr. Bradfield has had many years experience with the accreditation process as an ad hoc consultant and ten years service as a Council member of AAALAC International and as Council President. He has served as Director of the Division of Laboratory Animal Medicine and Attending Veterinarian at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and also as the Chair Department of Comparative Medicine, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina. He has extensive experience in academic laboratory animal medicine, managing animal programs and working with animal care and use committees. Prior to his career in laboratory animal medicine, Dr. Bradfield was a large animal practitioner. In his current role at AAALAC International, he is responsible for education and outreach activities.

Abstract:

The use of animals in research requires a strong ethical commitment to be good stewards of the animals in our care. This responsibility is shared by the Principal Investigator, Attending Veterinarian, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee or Ethics Committee (IACUC) as well as the institution. AAALAC International has conducted peer review and accreditation of animal research programs for 50 years to ensure that high standards of animal welfare and scientific integrity are implemented. A review of AAALAC site visit findings data will provide insights into the challenges associated with the management of a variety of research animal care and use programs across the globe. Strategies for employing sound practices will be highlighted for such topics as IACUC function, programs of veterinary care, occupational health and safety, animal environment and management and physical plant/animal facilities.

OMICS International Veterinary Summit-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Arnost Cepica photo
Biography:

Arnost Cepica has worked briefly in control of human biologics (1982-85). In 1985 he was one of the founding faculties of the new Atlantic Veterinary College in Canada. He has been an active Researcher and Reviewer in the areas of diagnosis, immunity and pathogenesis of viral infections. In recent years, he has concentrated his efforts on the development of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric quantification of IgG in unfractionated serum and plasma and its application in breeding for disease resistance to Aleutian disease, a persistent viral infection.

Abstract:

Hyper-gammaglobulinemia and ensuing decreased albumin (A): IgG ratio are hallmarks of persistent viral infections Aleutian disease of mink (AD, parvoviridae) and African swine fever (ASF, asfarviridae). Outcomes in individual hosts depend on the genetics of the host (breeds) in addition to the virus strain involved. We developed a high throughput, quantitative, reproducible and inexpensive application of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric determination of total IgG in unfractionated blood serum and plasma through determination of the A: IgG ratio. The ratio was chosen rather than simple IgG quantification because of its individualized significance in assessment of hyper-IgG and because of its technical reproducibility. The lack of correlation between A: IgG ratios and AD virus specific Ab determined by quantitative ELISA (r=0.385; p=0.008) suggested strong autoimmune component induced by the virus in diseased animals. Since both diseased and healthy infected animals had similar rates of PCR detection of the virus in their blood, we propose that autoimmunity is the pathogenetic feature that is under the genetic control in AD. Animals with normal A/γG=/>8 were bred and compared to animals with A/γG=/<8 (hyper-IgG) raised in the same facilities. A significant increase in the birth rates and a decrease in the progeny mortality occurred after the first year of the selection and after the second selection season the productivity returned to the levels comparable to the periods before AD outbreaks. We postulate that this approach might be useful for production of ASF disease resistant swine.

Break: 11:05-11:20

Keynote Forum

Michael D Flythe

United States Department of Agriculture
USA

Keynote: Potential rumen, vascular and production benefits of isoflavones in ruminant diets

Time : 11:20-11:50

OMICS International Veterinary Summit-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Michael D Flythe photo
Biography:

Michael D Flythe has a PhD in Microbiology from Cornell University. He is rumen Microbiologist with the USDA-ARS Forage-Animal Production Research Unit in Lexington, Kentucky. He is also an Adjunct Faculty Member in the University of Kentucky, Department of Animal & Food Sciences and an Associate Member of the Graduate Faculty. He has published more than 70 articles, chapters and proceedings and serves on the Editorial Boards of journals.

Abstract:

Legumes such as clovers are well known for their role in the nitrogen cycle and as high protein components in ruminant diets. The production of flavonoid secondary metabolites particularly isoflavones is another distinguishing feature of legumes. Isoflavones are phytoestrogens which can interfere with reproduction in grazing ruminants. However, our research group has identified potential benefits of isoflavones including positive effects on rumen function and relaxation of the vasculature. Extracts of red clover (Trifolium pratense) extracts decreased amino acid degradation by rumen bacteria. The active component in the clover extract was an isoflavone, biochanin A which potentiated the activity of endogenous rumen antimicrobials (bacteriocins). Ionophores (e.g., monensin) decrease rumen ammonia and increase feed efficiency by inhibiting the same group of bacteria. Thus, isoflavones are potential phytochemical alternatives to traditional ionophores. Biochanin A and other isoflavones are known to stimulate nitric oxide synthase in the circulatory system which led us to the hypothesis that clover extract would act as a vasodilator in ruminants. Vasodilation or vasorelaxation would be beneficial because many ruminants are exposed to ergot alkaloids that cause chronic vasoconstriction (i.e., fescue toxicosis). When goats received ergot alkaloid-rich fescue seed, vasoconstriction was observed in the carotid and recurrent interosseous arteries. Administration of clover extract decreased vasoconstriction. Beyond ergotism, we hypothesize that isoflavone-induced vasodilation could impart some of the same production benefits as β2-adrenergic receptor agonists (e.g., ractopamine). Together these results indicate that some of the production benefits of non-therapeutic drugs could be realized through properly managed legume-derived isoflavones or simply legumes.

OMICS International Veterinary Summit-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Fred Williams III photo
Biography:

Fred Williams III completed his undergraduate education at Tuskegee University and continued in the veterinary school there at Tuskegee to become a member of the class of 2001. He started a residency at the University of Missouri in 2002 and continued following the completion of his residency as a faculty instructor. Currently, he is at the University of Missouri as an Associate Professor in Pathobiology with a primary focus on clinical education of professional students and diagnostic work for the Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Lab at the University of Missouri. He has special interests in pathogenesis and exotic animal diseases.

Abstract:

Diagnosticians strive to come up with the best possible diagnoses from submitted specimens; unfortunately, there is occasionally disconnect between the samples received and the potential etiologies that we are trying to rule out. I will provide some quick pointers on the topic necropsy for ambulatory veterinarians, fetal necropsy, and in-clinic necropsy protocols in order to provide some background on what happens to your sample after submission. I will provide tips and tricks to avoid some of the more common errors in sample submission, and discuss some ways to improve yield and efficiency.